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Mission Statement

We are a charity committed to putting people back at the heart of The Causey, a street in Edinburgh’s Southside, by transforming it into a space that everyone can enjoy.

Currently dominated by vehicles and a redundant, unsightly traffic island, The Causey has the potential to be a fine civic space that draws attention to and respects its heritage.

By reconfiguring The Causey we will promote everyday walking and cycling while giving local people, students and visitors an attractive and accessible space that can be used for community-inspired events, neighbourliness, socialising and simply soaking up the historic surrounds – and maybe even some sun!

Why Now

There has never been a better time to invest in the spaces around us. The global pandemic that began in 2020 has changed how we live, travel and interact and the pressure to reduce vehicle emissions has never been stronger. By supporting The Causey you are:

➡ Promoting walking, cycling and active travel

➡ Putting people at the heart of a community

➡ Promoting greener living

➡ Embracing sustainability

➡ Respecting its heritage

➡ Providing space for community events and neighbourliness

➡ Creating a better civic space at the heart of Edinburgh’s  Southside

 

For more information get in touch with us info@thecausey.org or visit our news section here

Where We’re At

  • A design proposal for The Causey has been drawn up by Ironside Farrar Landscape Architects, based on local people’s ideas expressed in our community engagement. You can find this here.
  • To date we have a route to £1million of the funding we need to achieve this proposal, thanks to pledges and potential match funding from Sustrans. We are open to further donations and funding opportunities. For more information see below for contact details
  • To carry out the capital works necessary this design proposal needs an approved Traffic Regulation Order (TRO) and  Redetermination Order (RDO) which, due to a small number of unresolved objections, require a Scottish Ministers Hearing, currently delayed by Covid.

Who we work with

Messages of Support

Here’s what locals and supporters have to say.

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Lucy
Local Resident

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CJ
Local Resident
Kate
Local Resident

Sed nec blandit nibh. Pellentesque commodo suscipit gravida. Sed sit amet ex sed mi dignissim elementum in ut quam. Vivamus laoreet non mauris eget mattis. Nam turpis orci, consectetur vel accumsan sed, condimentum at sapien.

Joe
Local resident

Fast Facts

  • The Scots word ‘causey’ is from Old French caucie, a beaten way, and it means a road properly built and surfaced with metalling or pavings, or the making of one.
  • Crosscauseway is a street that historically links Causeyside (now Buccleuch Street) and the Pleasance and it is recorded in 1599 as having been “causeyed” giving the street its name: “Crosscausey”, later corrupted to “Crosscauseway”.
  • Sir Walter Scott, who grew up a stone’s throw from The Causey on George Square, mentions The Guse Dub, a spring and goose pond in the angle between West Crosscausey and Causeyside (now Buccleuch Street), in his childhood memories.
  • Robert Burns, Scotland’s famous bard, lodged at Buccleuch Pend or Entry in 1784. The original tenement was rebuilt in 2000 as affordable housing.
  • These two churches frame the historic space known locally as The Causey: Buccleuch and Greyfriars Church, C listed and dating from 1856, dominates the area with its towering steeple and has a significant hammer beam roof. The Chapel of Ease : B-listed and built in 1755-6 as an overflow for St Cuthbert’s, Lothian Road, has a tranquil secret graveyard housing several significant graves plus the unmarked grave of Deacon Brodie.
  • The Southside of Edinburgh is a Conservation Area lying on the edge of the World Heritage Site. The Causey lies within the Southside Conservation Area and is on the very edge of the World Heritage Site?